Lights make the difference (advanced)

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This topic contains 26 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Bob Brown 3 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #21662

    Cadi
    Keymaster

    When you are making are render, regardless of the software you are using, take your time and adjust the light. Its the same as in photography. The setting of the light makes a huge difference.
    I will show you some examples. All pictures are rendered with the same settings, no postwork. The only things i changed are the settings for the light.
    I set up a character and some basic props:
    Picture 1: Render with standard lights, no adjustment.
    Picture 2: Render with a premade light setting, not made for this image.
    Picture 3: My light setting, adjusted it to highlight the character and set the lights for the scene i want.
    Picture 4: Added some more light effects to my scene. Glow, light ermitting and a little blurr.

    I am pretty sure you can see the difference with all 4 images. And the only thing i changed here is the light. Take your time to try different settings, dont be shy to experiment with it. Make it until you found the perfect setting for your scene. But dont ignore it, and be ready to waste a lot of time to adjust the lights. In the end, it is worth the time.

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    #21667

    razer1911
    Keymaster

    The first 2 images look like they have no depth at all. Another thing I was thinking about – do you really have to experiment, or maybye there is math behind it (like calculations based on color, texture etc) ?

    #21670

    Cadi
    Keymaster

    When there is a math somewhere, i would love to know it. For now and for me at least, its a lot of experimenting. After some time you will get a idea and know what and where to add.
    The problem with the most render software is, that you see the full result only after the render. The light is calculated in the render progress. In the setup and posing, its possible that it looks perfect, but in the final render it can be totally screwed.

    #22709

    Bob Brown
    Participant

    Learning to use Poser lighting is really easy. But before a viewer sent me a chapter on lighting for digital graphics, I had been just guessing. Outdoor scenes and indoor scenes are different.

    Have to go, will explain in detail later.

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by  Bob Brown.
    #22711

    Bob Brown
    Participant

    Outdoor Lighting:

    Use 3 lights. Rename lights 1,2 & 3 to Main Light, Fill, and Sky.

    Main Light:
    Properties
    INFINITY
    Shadows = ON
    Ray trace = ON
    Shadow Map Size = 1024 or higher
    Parameters
    Shadows = 1.0
    Map Size = 1024
    Red, Green, Blue = 0.820
    Intensity = 100 %

    Point the Main Light to where you want the sun, have the shadows behind the figures.
    Fill
    Properties
    SPOT
    Shadows = OFF
    Parameters
    Angle End = 160
    Map Size = 1024
    Red, Green and Blue = 0.820
    Intensity = 40 % to 60%
    Other
    Object = Point at = Face, Chest, or Hips of central figure
    Position = Using two views (ie. top and side) and outline bring FILL light back to the area of the scene. If it is not visible, use xTran and zTran set to “0” and drag to where you want it. Fill is used to give some light to the shaded areas of the figures and is usually about 45 degrees from the Main Light (or Sun).

    Sky

    Properties
    Shadows = OFF
    INFINITE
    Parameters
    Map Size = 1024
    Red = .5
    Green = .96
    Blue = .96
    Intensity = 30% or 40%
    Position = Straight Overhead
    This light gives a subtle reflection of the blue-green sky to the scene.

    As simple as it looks, that is all you need for sunlight. You can vary shadow and the lights for different conditions, but this setting is for basic bright sunlight. Try it.

    If I get further requests for indoor lighting, I would be pleased to do it. But first try the above and see how it works.

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by  Bob Brown.
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    #22719

    Bob Brown
    Participant

    For quick checks on rendering progress, use AREA RENDER. Chose a small critical area, not including hair, but also the edge of shadow. Pull your square or rectangle and the process is much faster. It saves a lot of overnight waiting. I just found that PROGRESSIVE does a wonderful render, but is an overnight process. Also from GUIDES and FOCAL DISTANCE, which is adjusted within the Main Camera set with the right f-stop, gives reality to some scenes.

    #22721

    Bob Brown
    Participant

    These tips are priceless. Is no one there?

    #22729

    razer1911
    Keymaster

    Holy crap, I never thought light had so many rendering parameters. I’m gonna try DAZ 3d myself after the new year, I’ll surely use this settings.

    #22731

    Bob Brown
    Participant

    Good, Admin, let me know how it comes out.

    #22732

    Bob Brown
    Participant

    These settings are for Poser. I don’t know what is in DAZ Studio. I could never get it to work on my computers using Poser.

    #22742

    razer1911
    Keymaster

    So ‘Poser’ is just the name of the application you are using? Could you post the download link for this?

    #22744

    Bob Brown
    Participant

    No PoserPro 2014 is a full graphics art program. The full new download is about $350.00, but I see it as low a $60 from other sources. Of course DAZ Studio is free, but it is like giving away a razor to sell the blades at $5.00 each.

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